Ingredients Jump to Instructions ↓

  1. 4 heaped tablespoons of plain flour

  2. 2 beaten eggs

  3. Large pinch of salt

  4. 10 fl oz of milk (approximately)

  5. Goose fat, lard or vegetable oil for the tins

Instructions Jump to Ingredients ↑

  1. You must preheat the oven to 230c. I use a small electric oven with built in grill, which is thermostatically controlled so I can set the temperature quite accurately. I also use this oven for making cakes. I have checked the temperatures with an oven thermometer, so I know that the settings are accurate. But they will cook just as well in a conventional oven, as long as the temperature can be achievedThe recipe I use has been handed down through two generations. I remember watching my grandmother making Yorkshire puddings in a coal-fired oven over 50 years ago. Moreover, they always came out perfect. How she controlled the temperature, I shall never know. My mother used the same recipe and ultimately, I use the same simple recipe to obtain perfect puddings every time.

  2. Into a large bowl, sieve the salt and flour to get plenty of air into it. Slowly add the beaten eggs, whisking with a fork or balloon whisk, add the milk slowly until a consistency of single cream is achieved. Whisk until lump free. Set aside while you prepare the tins.

  3. You can use any shape or size of tin, depending on personal preference. If you are making ‘Toad in the Hole’ you will need large square tins. Simply brown the sausages before placing in the tin with the batter mix. However, for the point of this article, we are making individual Yorkshire puddings, so use bun tins.

  4. And this is where the magic begins. Put about a tablespoon of fat into each tin and place in the oven for about five minutes until the fat is smoking hot. This is essential for good rising puddings. When the fat has reached the smoking stage, carefully take the tins out of the oven and quickly pour the batter into each bun tins (don’t wear shorts when doing this, I still have the scars from the boiling fat). If all is well you should get a distinct ‘sizzle’ and you will see the batter bubble and boil in the hot fat. If you don’t get this effect, your fat is not hot enough and the puddings won’t rise as well as they should. Place the tins back in the oven as quickly as possible to maintain the heat It is very important that you do not open the oven door during the cooking process. If you do, your risen puddings will collapse and you will end up with ‘jaffa cakes ‘ (thin flat disks). The puddings should take about 15 minutes to cook to a crispy light brown. If you are using bigger tins, then the cooking time will probably take about 30 minutes When cooked, remove from the oven and serve immediately. If you have followed these instructions carefully, you should have about a 2-3 inch rise on your puddings.

  5. Cooks Tips:If, like me, you are using a small electric oven with grill, switch on the grill from time to time. The top heat from the grill helps the puddings to rise. You will see the fat sizzling on the surface of the batter. This is good and helps to provide a good firm pudding – but do not overdo the grilling and burn the pudding. The perfect pudding should have tall crisp sides and a hollow depression in the centre. If they are cooked to perfection, they should stay rigid and not collapse as soon as you remove them from the oven.

  6. If you are using a butane gas oven, you may not be able to achieve the 230c that you need. All you can do is turn your temperature control up to maximum and preheat for about 20 minutes. Propane gas burns hotter that Butane, so you should not have a problem if using this form of energy. Nearly all electric and natural gas ovens can reach the higher temperatures.

  7. You can find more interesting British and world-wide recipes at


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