Ingredients Jump to Instructions ↓

  1. 3 c All-purpose flour

  2. 1 ts Salt

  3. 1/2 ts Baking powder

  4. 3 tb Oliye oil

  5. 1/2 c (generous) mixture of half

  6. -milk, half water

Instructions Jump to Ingredients ↑

  1. I’m not much of a baker, but these recipes for an Italian bread and sauteed greens to stuff in it sounded good…

  2. Mix flour, salt and baking powder in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and pour in the olive oil and a little of the milk-water mixture. Start to mix the dough with a fork, gradually adding the rest of the liquid; you probably will need extra water, depending on the absorbency of the flour.

  3. When the dough has come together and leaves the sides of the bowl clean, form it into a rough ball and put it on a very lightly floured surface. Knead until it is smooth, about 10 minutes. Let rest for 10 to 30 minutes, at your convenience.

  4. When the dough has rested divide it into small balls, each about the size of a plum. Roll each ball out into a flat circle about 1/8-inch thick. Now put the heavy pan or bakestone on medium heat. Let the pan become hot enough to make a drop of water dance.

  5. Put the first piadina in the pan and press down with a wooden spatula. Let cook on one side for 20 seconds or so when you lift it to turn it over it should have whitened, and there will be the faint beginnings of small brown scorch marks. Repeat with the second side and turn the bread 2 or 3, times during cooking.

  6. When the bread is ready it will have puffed up like a pocket bread and should have small brown spots over its surface; as soon as you have achieved this effect, put the cooked piadina on a wire cake rack and proceed with the next one.

  7. Serve hot, with slices of prosciutto, salami or cheese, and perhaps olives, radishes or a little tomato for a quick lunch.

  8. Makes 10 to 12 breads.

  9. From ‘Italian Pizza and Hearth Breads.’

  10. From the San Francisco Chronicle, 8/10/88.

  11. Posted by Stephen Ceideberg; November 10 1992.


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